Children 
Podiatry is not just about looking after adult feet, there is also a great emphasis in children and the development of their feet. 

As the foot develops and undergoes more wear and tear over the years, there are a number of changes that can occur- some normal, others not. If you have any concerns, seek professional care immediately- it may not just disappear automatically.

Make sure your child's shoes are a correct size, as tight footwear can slow development and restrict movement. It may be necessary to buy shoes every 3 to 6 months to ensure the proper fit.
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Young feet have a large amount of soft-tissue and fat so a lack of pain does not always indicate healthy feet.

It is very important to monitor your child’s pattern of walking (gait) for any abnormalities, such as in or out-toeing, knock knees as it is possible during these early stages of development to correct abnormal posture, which can often limit future biomechanical issues if properly treated.

After performing a gait analysis, your podiatrist may decide that a range of treatments are required, including orthotic prescription, muscular stretching and strengthening exercises, appropriate footwear selection and padding/strapping to the foot.


Adults
Certain foot types seem to be predisposed to biomechanical problems, and there are often hereditary risk factors as well. A particularly common condition that affects women more than men is known as "Bunions". Although the exact cause is not fully known, there are several risk factors that can be reduced or managed through proper podiatric care. Some of them are: constrictive footwear (e.g. high heels), reduced mobility or hypermobility of the foot.

Certain foot types seem to be predisposed to biomechanical problems, and there are often hereditary risk factors as well. A particularly common condition that affects women more than men is known as "Bunions". Although the exact cause is not fully known, there are several risk factors that can be reduced or managed through proper podiatric care. Some of them are: constrictive footwear (e.g. high heels), reduced mobility or hypermobility of the foot.